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Bio
In August of 2011, only days after moving to LA, musician Casey Wickstrom was nearly killed in a head on collision with a drunk driver. What followed was four years of drug dependency, suicidal depression, and a surge of music and writing. Finally able to get clean in 2016, Wickstrom set to work on a cohesive collection of songs that would become his newest album "Bleed Out." 

"Bleed Out" is Casey Wickstrom's fifth studio album, featuring Wickstrom on vocals, guitars, lap slide, and bass guitar. Accompanied by drummer Austin Vidonn, the album is a darkly introspective and deeply personal musical experience; a wide range of styles and sounds that are ultimately a testament to Wickstrom's singular style.

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Evocation promo Video

Hope Promo Video

A master guitarist, and his enthusiasm is infectious. Once he starts playing, he’s instantly compelling. The magnitude of his talent is obvious and his energy level is through the roof.
— Music Connection Magazine
Haunting . . . [Wickstrom’s] words carry a remarkable honesty . . . showcasing a bared soul that doesn’t emote at the expense of astute songcraft.
— Content Magazine

Hollywood & Vine promo video

Upper Hermosa Mtn Blues promo Video

Masterfully arranged . . .
— Indie Shuffle
On his new album, Bleed Out, the San Jose native grapples with getting sober in the wake of several years of depression, drugs and alcohol. The balance of bright notes and cautious optimism evokes sunshine at the end of a pitch-black tunnel.
— Metroactive, San Jose
I never thought I would encounter a better lyricist than Nick Cave. Well, it looks like I just have after listening to Casey Wickstrom’s latest anthemic Alt Rock single Hollywood & Vine. Along with being quite the wordsmith Wickstrom also has an ethereally raw organic edge to his vocal prowess . . . As Acoustic Alt Rock goes, it doesn’t get much more progressive than Hollywood & Vine, the high-energy feel switches from a Lo Fi reminiscence to Jangle Pop guitar riffs that even Johnny Marr would be proud of.
— A&R Factory